Wartime Collectables
Military Antiques

Andrew H. & Gale V. Lipps
P.O. Box 165
Camden, SC 29021

USA

ph. 803-463-6935 (text o.k.)
Email wartime@wartimecollectables.com
(Email is far better than phone!)

Militaria updated 8/17/19

Ebay auctions

____________________________________________________

Boy Bugler of the 2nd Missouri Cavalry

Private & Bugler WilLiam B. Caton
Company E, 2nd Missouri Cavalry
(Merrill’s Horse)
Enlisted October 1, 1862 age 13, from Sturgeon, Missouri.
Mustered out Sept. 19, 1865
 

In August, 1861, Capt. Lewis Merrill, 2nd Cavalry, U.S. Army, received authority from Gen. Fremont to organize a cavalry regiment at Benton Barracks Missouri for immediate service in the field. Capt. Merrill recruited and enlisted eight hundred men in less than one month. He began rigorously instruction and drill and raised the regiment to a high standard of discipline. Two companies of cavalry became "Merrill Horse," 2nd Missouri Cavalry Regiment.  In September, 1861 the regiment received orders from Gen. Fremont to march to Springfield, Mo. to operate against guerrilla organizations in the state attached tI the Dept.  Of Missouri. They served at Sedalia,  Saline County, Milford. Shawnee Mound, Blackwater River, Roan's Tan Yard, Silver Creek and Knobnoster..

From there they attached to the 1st Cavalry Division, Army of Arkansas. Moved to Northern Missouri and duty at Columbia, Glasgow, Sturgeon, Paris, Huntsville, Palmyra and Warrenton again operating against guerrillas . Expedition into Schuyler and Scotland Counties, Porter's and Poindexter's guerrillas, July 12-August 8, 1862. Near Memphis, Mo., July 18. Brown Springs July 27. Moore's Mills, near Fulton, July 28. Kirksville August 6 (Detachment). Pursuit of Poindexter August 8-15, with skirmishes at Grand River, Lee's Ford, Chariton River and Walnut Creek, near Stockton, Switzler's Mill, Little Compton Ferry, Yellow Creek, Roanoke, Scotland and Boone Counties.

They joined Davidson's Cavalry Division at Pilot Knob June, 1863. Expedition to Little Rock, Ark., July 1-September 10. Grand Prairie August 17. Brownsville August 25. Bayou Metoe or Reed's Bridge August 27. Reconnoissance from Brownsville August 29. Bear Skin Lake, Ashby's Mills, September 7. Bayou Fourche and capture of Little Rock September 10. Pursuit of Price September 11-13. Near Little Rock September 11.

Duty at Little Rock till March, 1864. Steele's Expedition to Camden March 23-May 3. Benton Road March 23-24. Okolona April 2-3. Prairie D'Ann April 9-12. Camden April 15-18. Moro Bottom April 25-26. Jenkins' Ferry, Saline River, April 30. Scatterville July 28. Duty in Arkansas till September.

Operating against Price September and October. Booneville, Mo., October 9-12. Little Blue October 21. Big Blue, State Line, October 22. Westport October 23. Battle of Charlot October 25. Mine Creek, Osage River, Marias des Cygnes, October 25.

Grierson's Expedition from Memphis against Mobile & Ohio Railroad December 21, 1864, to January 15, 1865 (Co. "E").

Then to the 7th Army Corps, 2nd Brigade, Cavalry Division, District of West Tennessee, and mNear Memphis they then oved to Chattanooga, Tenn., and duty operating against guerrillas in Georgia and Alabama and escorting trains from Chattanooga to Atlanta January to September, 1865. Mustered out September 19, 1865.

Fox reports that Merrill's Horse suffered 3 Officers Killed or Mortally Wounded 1 Officers Died of Disease, and 53 Enlisted Men Killed or Mortally Wounded.

 

Merrill Horse

Verse One:

The "Merrill Blue Caps" have been out in the field,

And have chased the wild foe to his den;

They have conquer'd Poindexter, caused Porter to yield,

And peace reigns triumphant again.

Missouri, the star-link of State now is free

Wherever the "Blue Caps" have been;

All glory and honor to Merrill shall be,

He's the Champion and pride of his men.

All glory and honor to Merrill shall be,

He's the Champion and pride of his men.

Verse Two:

Where many vile rebels lay biting the dust,

And Major Hunt charged in the van.

The guerrilla chief monster entrench'd in his den,

Lay waiting to deal the death blow,

But routed and whipp'd, their chief, Poindexter, fled,

While "Merrill's Horse" charg'd on the foe.

But routed and whipp'd, their chief, Poindexter, fled,

While "Merrill's Horse" charg'd on the foe.

But routed and whipp'd, their chief, Poindexter, fled,

While "Merrill's Horse" charg'd on the foe.

 Verse Three:

Next to the death-knell at Memphis they're called

To cope with their thrice maddened foes,

Where steel meets with steel each foe is appalled

At the death groans, as crimson blood floes.

But Robinson thrice had led on to the charge,

When balls pierced his side, and he fell.

Ere leaving his Major to charge with his men,

"'Tis the last," said he "Major, farewell."

Ere leaving his Major to charge with his men,

"'Tis the last," said he "Major, farewell."

 Verse Four:

The battle was ended, the foe left the field,

The gain was but loss to us then---

But, true to our cause, and sworn never to yield,

We resolved to fight Porter again.

On! onward we trailed him as southward he roamed,

Till at Moore's Mill the contest began,

Where rifle balls whistled and dread cannon moaned,

To the music of Guitar's bold plan.

Where rifle balls whistled and dread cannon moaned,

To the music of Guitar's bold plan.

Verse Five:

Four hours Porter fought, feeling sure of success,

Till our presence to him was made known;

"Great God!" cried the guerrilla, "the Blue Caps play chess,

I will fight the Militia or none!"

His lines broke asunder, his comrades dismayed,

To the victors the battle field gave,

And proudly the "Blue Caps" in armor arrayed,

Cried "Our banner forever shall wave."

And proudly the "Blue Caps" in armor arrayed,

Cried "Our banner forever shall wave."

Verse Six:

At Kirksville the death stroke to Porter was played,

And hundreds of rebels licked dust;

The guerrilla bands scattered, their leaders estrayed,

Their cause since forever seems lost;

There the heartless you Coudrey dashed unto the foe

Where hall-showers of lead rest the air,

And laughing at smoke clouds and armor's bright glow,

Seemed pleased at the conflict of war.

And laughing at smoke clouds and armor's bright glow,

Seemed pleased at the conflict of war.

Verse Seven:

Once more the land-pirates assembled their bands,

But Hunt and the "Blue Caps" were there,

And near Compton's Ferry the chased the brigands,

Entrusting some lead to their care;

Suprised at such fare, a skedaddle began,

Into Grand River, pell-mell went they,

Instead of retreating the Butternuts ran,

And the daring "Blue Caps" won the day.

Instead of retreating the Butternuts ran,

And the daring "Blue Caps" won the day.

Verse Eight:

Our Colors and Standard these names bear aloft,

'Wid the battle red banners of fame,

And as oft as we can, while a rebel is left,

We will add our stripes a new name.

While a star or a stripe to our flag-staff belongs,

Any foe of our ensign will meet,

We'll protect it, adore it, and praise it in songs,

Or make it our last winding sheet.

We'll protect it, adore it, and praise it in songs,

Or make it our last winding sheet.

 

75th Anniversary Battle of Gettysburg Reunion

Those who served in the battle of Gettysburg July 1863 realized even as the battle cleared that they were on historically hallowed ground. Following the war many state and veteran sponsored reunions were held and the tenth, twenty-fifth, and fiftieth year anniversaries were major events. Most believed that the 1913 50 year reunion would be the last.

However the Federal Government organized a 75th Reunion Blue & Gray Encampment in 1938 Gettysburg. Invitations were sent, train fare provided,tent accommodations were set up and each veteran was allowed to.be accompanied by an attendee to assist. There were approximately 8,000 remaining veterans of the Civil War, average age was 94, and 1,359 Federal and 486 Confederate Civil War veterans attended the 1938 Reunion. Each Veteran and each Attendee was presented with a named Federal medal for their participation. The U.S. Army and the Boy Scouts of America provided further assistance at the reunion. President Franklin D. Roosevelt's July 3 address preceded the unveiling of the Eternal Light Peace Memorial.

William B Caton, Bugler for the 2nd Missouri Cavalry, living in Winfield, KS, attended with his son as his attendee. He had named his son after his famous Cavalry Commander Lewis Merrill.

 

75th Reunion Roster

http://segtours.com/blog/archives/2454